FEATURED ITEM: Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike

Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike

Roman Marble Statuette Idol of Greek goddess Nike Presenting Herself Sexually

Baidun Fine Antiquities – Since 1927 – http://www.Baidun.com

FEATURED ITEM: Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike

This Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike (as of 07 / April / 2017) is still available for sale from http://www.Baidun.com:

Reference: SI_RM_1060
Civilization:  Roman, 200 C.E.
Size: H. 21.5 cm
Condition: Tips of the wings and neck rejoined, otherwise in fine condition
Price: Available upon request
Provenance: The Baidun Collection

DIRECT WEB SITE LINK: http://baidun.com/roman-marble-statuette-idol-of-greek-goddess-nike/
SHORT URL:  http://www.goo.gl/4rmCKp

 

Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike

Nike – The Greek goddess of Victory

Nike was a Greek war goddess who personified victory.  Her Roman equivalent was Victoria.  The Greek goddess Nike was variously described as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal).

Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace (also known as “The Winged Nike“). Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek coins.

 

Equivalents in the Mesopotamian (Sumerian / Akkadian) Pantheons

The Greek goddess Nike is most likely a Greek adaptation of the Babylonian/Assyrian goddess Ištar (Ishtar), the Mesopotamian East Semitic (Akkadian (Assyrian and Babylonian)) goddess of fertility, love, war, sex, and power.  She is the counterpart to the earlier attested Sumerian Inanna who was the goddess of love, beauty, sexual desire, fertility, knowledge, wisdom, war, and combat. She was one of the most widely venerated deities in the ancient Sumerian pantheon.  Ishtar is the cognate for the later attested Northwest Semitic (Aramean/Canaanite) goddess Astarte (Ashtoreth),* as well as the Armenian goddess Astghik. Ishtar was an important deity in Mesopotamian religion which was extant from c. 3500 BCE, until its gradual decline between the 1st and 5th centuries CE with the spread of Christianity.

Equivalents in the Egyptian Pantheon

Among equivalents to- or influences upon- the Greek goddess Nike from the Egyptian pantheon, there are several candidates who are described as goddesses of war (in various capacities).  They are 1.) Bastet; 2.) Menhit; 3.) Neith; and 4.) Sekhmet.  The uniting of Egyptian cultures of Upper and Lower Egypt had also united deities that shared similar roles and usually the same imagery.  In Upper Egypt, Sekhmet was the parallel warrior lioness deity. Often similar deities merged into one with the unification, but that did not occur with these deities having such strong roots in their cultures. Instead, these goddesses began to diverge.

These Egyptian goddesses of war are:  1.) Bastet, who was the goddess of warfare in Lower Egypt, the Nile River delta region before the unification of the cultures of ancient Egypt; 2.) Menhit, whose name depicts a warrior status, as it means “(she who) massacres”; 3.) Neith, goddess of war and of hunting; and 4.) Sekhmet (or Sachmis – also spelled Sakhmet, Sekhet, or Sakhet, among other spellings, means “the powerful one”) is a warrior goddess as well as goddess of healing.

 

The Egyptian war goddess Neith ~ Nike

The Egyptian war goddess Neith (also spelled Nit, Net, or Neit) provides an interesting example.  There are possible (probable) linguistic similarities of the name Nike (pronounced “Ni-ke” or “Ni-kay”; “Nee-ke” or “Nee-kay”) with the name Neith (pronounced “Nith” or “Neeth”; “Nit” or “Neet”).

Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike

For the ancient Greeks – among their pantheon of gods and goddesses – the Greek goddess Nike (in the anthropomorphized form of a young, winged woman) personified victory in war.  In this outstanding example of ancient Greco-Roman art, the Nike portrayed here is represented standing here on a base with an inclined surface (perhaps on the summit of a hilltop or “high place” of worship) with her wings unfolded and outstretched upright towards the heavens.  She is dressed in a peplos fastened at her shoulder and tied with a cord just below her bosom.

The young woman’s pose, the movement of the peplos, and the position of the wings may indicate that she has just alighted on the ground.  The Nike portrayed here is standing in an upright position (almost at attention) while a strong wind blows from directly in front of her, therefore causing her peplos to cling against the front of her body (as well as lift the dress from behind as wind will do).

Upon first glance, the rendering of the face may seem a bit impersonal and idealized (indeed her traits recall several portraits of Faustine the Elder, the wife of Antoninus Pius).  The large folds of her peplos are reminiscent of the sculptures in the local style of the Levant (Syria and Jordan), whence this piece probably originated.

Roman Marble Statuette (Idol) of Greek goddess Nike
SHORT URL:  http://www.goo.gl/4rmCKp

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FEATURED ITEM: Egyptian Bas-Relief Pink Limestone Fragment with Two Female Figures

Egyptian Bas-Relief Pink Limestone Fragment with Two Female Figures

EgyptianBas-ReliefPinkLimestoneFragmentWithTwoFemaleFigures

Baidun Fine Antiquities – Since 1927 – http://www.Baidun.com

FEATURED ITEM: Egyptian Bas-Relief Pink Limestone Fragment with Two Female Figures

This Egyptian Bas-Relief Pink Limestone Fragment with Two Female Figures (as of 08 / March / 2017) is still available for sale from http://www.Baidun.com:

Reference:  SI_EG_1048
Civilization:  Egyptian New Kingdom. Early 18th Dynasty. Reign of Amenhotep I, 1525 B.C.E. – 1504 B.C.E.
Size:  H. 23 cm
Condition:  Excellent condition
Price:  Available upon request
Provenance:  Private French Collection, French Passport # 125189

DIRECT WEB SITE LINK: http://baidun.com/egyptian-bas-relief-pink-limestone-fragment-with-two-female-figures/

SHORT URL:  http://www.goo.gl/7Y4Neu

Egyptian Bas-Relief Pink Limestone Fragment with Two Female Figures

Carved Limestone Bas-Relief from the Egyptian New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty from the 18th dynasty of the Egyptian New Kingdom, this ancient Egyptian Bas-Relief (Bas Relief) was carved from a pink limestone and depicts two female figures, their left arms raised across their chest holding lotus buds. In their right arms they hold a stylized menat, a ritual object to foster fruitfulness and good health in women. Both wear long close fitting garments.

Inscribed Egyptian Hieroglyphics with Name ‘Nes-Noub’

A beautiful Egyptian hieroglyphics inscription above the figures gives the name ‘Nes-Noub‘ (Noub is also known as Chnoubis among other variants).  The style of the carving allows a fairly precise dating to the reign of Amenhotep I (r. 1514 – 1493 BCE) at the very beginning of the 18th Dynasty. Features such as the well defined nostrils, giving the nose a pinched appearance are typical of this period.

From Time of Pharaoh Amenhotep I (Amenophis I) son of Ahmose I

Amenhotep I, also called Amenophis I, was the son of Ahmose I (r. 1539 – 1514 BCE), the founder of the 18th dynasty (1539–1292 BCE).  Ahmose I completed the expulsion of the Hyksos (i.e. Asiatic rulers of Egypt), invaded Palestine, and re-exerted Egypt’s hegemony over northern Nubia, to the south.  He effectively extended Egypt’s boundaries in Nubia (modern Sudan)

FEATURED ITEM:  Egyptian Bas-Relief Pink Limestone Fragment with Two Female Figure

SHORT URL:  http://www.goo.gl/7Y4Neu

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FEATURED ITEM: Egyptian Wooden Sarcophagus Mask

Egyptian Wooden Sarcophagus Mask

egyptianwoodensarcophagusmask

This ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus mask (as of 09 / October / 2016) is still available for sale from www.Baidun.com:

Reference:  #SI_EG_1056
Civilization:  Egyptian, Late Dynastic Period, 600 B.C.E.
Size:  H. 49 cm
Condition:  Fine condition
Price:  Available upon request
Provenance:  Former French private collection A. Z. 1980. French Passport # 132645
DIRECT WEB SITE LINK:  http://baidun.com/wooden-sarcophagus-mask/

This phenomenal mask of a sarcophagus predates modern art by centuries, yet its incredible design stands equal to the work of our most acclaimed contemporary sculptors. The wide set eyes and smooth brow pull the viewer in and reflect a gaze separated from this world by thousands of years. The sculpture’s imposing headdress surrounds the delicate features of the face in a protective and naturally textured shroud.

Carved from wood, the artist’s skill is seen in the tiny details that make up this large piece. Preserved in the desert climate for centuries, this piece remains in excellent condition, dating from Egypt’s Late Dynastic Period.

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FEATURED ITEM: An Expressive Greek Head of a Satyr

An Expressive Greek Head of a Satyr

greekheadofsatyr

Though this extremely fine ancient sculpture of ours has long ago been sold, we wanted to feature this item here to demonstrate the quality of extremely fine antiquities that we have been dealing in since 1927.  Please visit our web site to see more of our very fine antiquities available for sale and global delivery – www.Baidun.com.

Reference:  #SI_GR_1003
Civilization:  Central Asia, with influence from Ghandara, 200 B.C.E. – 100 B.C.E.
Size:  Ht. 24 cm
Condition:  Damage to nose, chin and two locks of hair.
Price:  Sold
Provenance:  Private Collection R.J. 1962.
DIRECT WEB SITE LINK:  http://baidun.com/an-expressive-greek-head-of-a-satyr/

The expressive face of this satyr reveals a right eye that is slightly lower than the left and a smirk carved purposefully askew. The satyr himself may be of Greek origin, yet this piece hails from central Asia, a result of the clash of cultures that arose out of Alexander the Great’s successful campaigns throughout the region.

The result was a vast melting pot of culture, art and religion that spanned the subsequent Hellenistic era of Greek history, when Greek cultural influence and power was at its zenith in Europe and Asia. At the time, this satyr’s inlaid eyes and simple braided crown were uncommon in Asian art, particularly seen in Buddhist sculptures of Siddhartha from the Gandhara region of northern Pakistan. Other examples include the famous Parthian relief from Hatra, as well as the hair and head of the Peshawar Museum’s Bodhisattva. In the years after Alexander’s conquests, the region’s sculpture incorporated such elements in the intervening years as trade and technology increased the mingling of Eastern and Western cultures, creating new currents of art and thought that still inspire us to this day.

The round face is dominated by deep holes for eyes which were originally inlaid. The root of the nose is strongly furrowed, as too is the forehead above, its series of wavy grooves mirroring the curvature of the expressive high-arched brows. Prominent cheekbones, with fleshy, rounded cheeks below; under the broad nose, full sensuous lips with dimples. To either side of the face, long, pointed ears with deep auricles. A exuberant shock of curling locks, whose individual strands are articulated with incised lines, is parted in the middle to form an anastole and spreads outwards in three luxuriant strands to frame the face.

Similarly rendered locks entirely envelope the head, wig-like, in schematically arranged rows. The sinews of the neck form a pronounced V-shape. The combination of glowering features and unruly hair impart to the head an intensely expressive quality. Encircling the crown of the head is a rope-like wreath which served as the base for an attachment, its upper surface flat to accommodate another element. Head of a statue, in all likelihood an architectural support such as a Caryatid.

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